Bugaboo Falls

Bugaboo Mountain Falls | Beebower Productions

The wheels were turning in his mind.  Spectacular waterfalls.  Cascading streams of water.  Powerful torrents pounding the rocks below.  Dad could see it in his mind.  Now he just had to find it.

From the minute that Dad learned advertising executives were looking for a spectacular waterfall as part of their new ad campaign, he began researching potential spots even though the advertising execs hadn’t decided which photographer would win the assignment. 

Undeterred by this minor detail, Dad flew to Canada, a place his research confirmed had many spectacular waterfalls, to hunt for the perfect one.   First stop on his quest–the remote Bugaboo Falls in British Columbia, Canada. 

To reach the waterfall, he and his assistant zoomed down 50 miles of rutted, rough logging roads in their rented truck. The duo then hiked down into the river valley lugging camera gear (which meant they hiked back up hill too) for Dad to get this shot. 

This photo could have been taken with any number of cameras.  Dad chose the Horseman SW-612 for several reasons.  The waterfall was quite wide.  Since this was taken in the days of film and Photoshop was in its infancy, shooting the picture correctly was of primary importance.  A panoramic camera would allow Dad to show the full width of the falls without distracting distortions that could happen with a regular 35mm camera and wide-angle lens.

The Horseman is a lightweight camera compared to other medium format rigs.  Since Dad was hiking to the falls, every ounce counted. 

The camera also had a viewing lens on top along with masks to fit three different size lenses.  It was almost like using a view camera, a tool that many landscape photographers routinely used.  A view camera is a heavier and more expensive option than the Horseman.

Finally, the size of the film played in Dad’s favor.  Knowing that the advertising execs would blow the image up to billboard size, Dad chose the Horseman because he could use 120 roll film as opposed to 35mm.  The large size of the 120 roll film provided more detail and resolution, something you definitely wanted if a photo of epic proportions would be greeting you along the highway.

To create that epic photo Dad got up very early one morning waded knee-deep into the water at the base of the falls and set up his heavy-duty Gitzo tripod in the swirling, churning waters.  He shot for about two hours, choosing a slow shutter speed to create the foamy streams of water cascading over the rocks.

All of that hiking and shooting created a big appetite.  Once the shoot was in the can, Dad scrambled out of the river and exchanged his muddy duds for clean jeans.  He and his assistant headed up river for some goodies at the ski resort along the creek. 

They didn’t stay long, though, because a giant storm was pressing down on the area.  They needed to get off the logging road before it turned into a muddy monster that could suck a small truck into its depths.  The pair made it safely back to Radium Hot Springs before the worst of the storm hit.  Despite the quick exit, it had been a successful day at the waterfall.

Upon his return to Dallas, Dad learned that the advertising folks did want him to shoot the ad.  He showed them the Bugaboo Falls photo along with several other locations and then waited on their decision.  He waited.  And waited.  And waited. 

The advertising team finally decided they wanted to use the Bugaboo location, but it was December and the range was buried under 30 feet of snow.  (That wasn’t a typo.  They really get at least 30 feet of snow in the winter.)  That extreme weather also freezes the waterfall during wintertime.  So Bugaboo Falls was a no-go for this particular ad campaign.

Luckily Dad knew how ad agencies worked.  He already had a “Plan B” ready for the ad folks in case they took too long deciding on Bugaboo.  He would piece together three different photographs from Canada and Colorado to create the perfect backdrop for beer sales.  At one point, he would find himself dangling over a half-frozen creek to get “a part” of the shot.  You can read all about that adventure here.

While the advertising folks weren’t going to use the Bugaboo photograph, Dad realized he had a very nice image to add to his portfolio.  Plus he had a great story on the lengths he’d go to make his clients happy. 

 

If you like this photo, check out some more fun Outdoor Art!

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Save the Cranes!

Whooping Crane Take Off | Beebower Productions

They’re international jet setters, flying 2,500 miles just for some tasty food and warm winter weather.  Like any good A-Lister celebrity, whooping cranes steal the show everywhere they fly.

These five-foot-tall birds make an amazing journey each year from their nesting grounds at Wood Buffalo National Park in the Northwest Territories of Canada to Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Coastal Texas. 

Whooping Cranes Landing | Beebower Productions

Whooping Crane 411

Whooping cranes garner so much attention because so few have survived.  In 1941 a mere 21 cranes existed in the wild due to habitat destruction and hunting.  Alarmed conservationists soon created plans to help the birds rebound.

These birds easily made the endangered species list.  Because of that they’ve even managed to get two countries to work together on restoration efforts.  Both Canada and the United States protected prime habitat for nesting and migration.

The Canadian government created Wood Buffalo National Park in 1922 to protect the last remaining bison herd in northern Canada.  But happily the whooping cranes’ last natural nesting area also falls under the park’s protection.

Whooping cranes mate for life, doing elaborate jumping, running and dancing displays to attract that special someone.  They build nests in marshy areas and tend the youngsters together.   

The hatchlings grow quickly going from 4 inches tall at birth to 5 feet tall with a 7-foot or larger wingspan as adults.  In just eighty days these babies morph into strong fliers.  At the end of summer, all of the whoopers get ready to head south for a winter vacation in the Lone Star State.

The birds often travel in family or small groups, stopping to rest at various spots from Canada to South Dakota to North Texas before reaching the Gulf Coast of Texas.  The 2,500-mile trip can take up to 50 days. 

In 2017 biologists captured and tagged a three-month-old whooping crane at Wood Buffalo National Park.  They followed every move of the bird’s journey from Canada to Texas with the help of his cellular-based telemetry unit.  In true scientific form, researchers named the young crane “7A”.  To read about “7A’s” adventures, go Here.

While Canada got an early start in helping the whooping cranes, the United States government followed suit and set aside Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in 1937 because of its importance for migrating birds and other wildlife.  In another happy coincidence several years later, scientists discovered the dwindling populations of whooping cranes and the importance of the coastal Texas wildlife refuge to these birds.

Barrier islands, bays, shallow marshes and tidal areas along the Gulf Coast near Rockport and Austwell provide perfect foraging opportunities for the whooping cranes.  The coast serves up a buffet of blue crabs, shrimp, clams, wolfberries, insects, seeds, frogs, snakes and mice.  It’s a whooping crane nirvana.  So the birds hang out in Texas until mid-April when they return to their Canadian nesting grounds.

Over the years the numbers of this rare bird kept building.  In 2017 the official count showed 431 whooping cranes at Aransas.  The population exploded compared to the measly 21 from the 1940s.  But it’s still a small number of a very special bird.

Whooping Crane Preening | Beebower Productions

A Wing and a Prayer

Whooping Cranes definitely caught Dad’s attention.  These large, elegant and endangered birds were hanging out a couple hours drive from his house.  The possibility of photographing them drew Dad to South Texas like a moth to the flame.

He’d visited Aransas National Wildlife Refuge before, but he hadn’t seen any of the cranes.  After doing more research, Dad decided chartering a boat would be a better way to successfully photograph these graceful birds.  After all they spent most of their time in marshy areas far away from people.

Captain Kevin Sims with Aransas Bay Birding Charters regularly brought photographers very close to the whoopers.  So Dad boarded The Jack Flash with high hopes early one cold, overcast morning in February.  The fog really socked in the bay, creating nice soft light.

Captain Kevin took up photography in 2004.  So he knew what photographers needed to make amazing photos—great light and access.  He worked really hard to get Dad in the best possible shooting situations. 

It helps that Captain Kevin fished and explored the waterways around Aransas for over 45 years.  He not only knows his way around a tricky area, he also understands the wildlife that makes the bays, rivers and marshes home.  In fact, he knows the area so well that a thick fog bank with low visibility prevent him from successfully navigating the waters that morning.

Captain Kevin hit all of the usual spots for whooping crane activity.  The Jack Flash glided through Aransas Bay, past Goose Island State Park and by Aransas National Wildlife Refuge.  But the wily birds seemed particularly skittish that morning and flew away before the boat got close enough for Dad to take a photo, even with his Canon 400mm lens plus Canon 1.4 extender.  Several hours passed with many “near misses” and a tangle with a sandbar.  Dad got discouraged.  Prayer seemed like a good option since it would take a miracle to get a shot on this morning.

Just when Dad was ready to give up, Captain Kevin spotted a pair of whoopers near the Intracoastal Waterway eating blue crabs in marshes.  As they pulled up to the sand bar another whooping crane flew a little too close to these birds’ territory. 

Dad captured several frames of the first whooping crane taking off to confront the intruder.  He also photographed the other crane preening plus a roseate spoonbill that landed near the returning cranes.  Dad was a happy camper.

Whooping Crane in Flight | Beebower Productions

Hurricane Harvey

Dad’s whooping crane adventures took place well before Hurricane Harvey.  So we watched in horror this last summer as the coast of Texas got slammed.  We wondered how all of the fantastic folks we’d met through photo adventures faired, much less the abundant wildlife along the coast.  The whooping cranes were safe in Canada at the time, but many other birds were caught in the storm.

While many people in nearby Rockport and Port Aransas experienced complete destruction during Harvey, we’re happy to report Captain Kevin’s back on the water, running his boat trips.  Aransas National Wildlife Refuge still welcomes visitors although many buildings have been damaged or destroyed.

The coastal marsh habitat weathered the storm, although evidence like buoys, plastic and other man-made items washed in from the bay.  Scientists’ main concern for the whoopers stemmed from potential water pollution and an increase in the salinity of the birds’ drinking water.  While the storm did destroy a lot of vegetation, the highly prized wolfberry still awaited the whoopers this fall. 

As Texans banded together to help each other in the aftermath of the hurricane, several organizations jumped into action to help the whooping cranes.  While clean up and recovery is ongoing, the cranes showed up on schedule this past fall and appear to be doing well.  The return of these jet-setting birds gives Texans hope that life will return to normal sometime soon.

If You Go

  • Hurricane Harvey impacted much of the Gulf Coast in August 2017.  Many businesses are rebuilding, so check out the availability of food, gas and lodging thoroughly before heading to the coast.
  • Make reservations with Captain Sims in advance Here
  • You can share the cost of a charter if you’ve got several photographer friends.  Check it out Here.
  • Pair down your gear.  Tripods and camera bags are allowed and can be stored inside the cabin, but we’ve found the less gear the better.  We like to take one camera with a zoom lens for anything that happens close to the boat as well as one camera with a long lens, at least a 400mm.  Obviously you’ll need a tripod for any large lenses.
  • Bring snacks and drinks.  Captain Kevin provides water and soft drinks.
  • Don’t forget the Dramamine if you’re prone to sea sickness.
  • Wear rubber soled shoes.  Decks can be slippery.
  • Bring sunscreen and a hat.  Even on an overcast day the glare from the water can give you sunburn.
  • Dress warmly in the winter.  Winds off the water can make it chilly.
  • The best time of year to see whooping cranes is mid-November through mid-March, although they begin arriving in October and leave by April.

Horse Stampede

Horse Stampede | Beebower Productions

Dad found himself buried underground in a steel water tank waiting for a herd of about 50 horses to stampede over the top of him.  Dad hoped to capture a unique angle from below the horses.  He knew this would be challenging to pull off safely.  He turned to his friend Red Wolverton, who knew lots about movie magic and even more about horses. 

The plan revolved around a steel tank with slits cut in the sides for cameras.  The tank would be buried inside Red’s corral with Dad and his crew inside.  The slits would allow Dad to be at eye-level with the horses’ hooves and still have a degree of safety.  Red selected an ordinary live stock water tank to accommodate a photographer, motion picture photographer plus their assistants and their cameras.

Steel Tank Photo Lair | Beebower Productions

On the day of the shoot, Dad and the three guys got situated in the 7-foot diameter pillbox, as Red and crew called the modified tank.  Red then used the backhoe to fill in the door area with dirt.  About one foot of the tank was visible above ground.  That placed the camera openings in the perfect position for some amazing pictures.   

Pretty soon fifty horses supplied by Red barreled down the road right toward the corral and Dad.  Wranglers on either side of the herd ensured the horses hit the mark.  Nobody really knew what the horses would do when they reached the buried tank. 

The photo crew could feel the ground vibrating before they saw the horses.  Then things happened fast and furiously.  The horses kept coming toward the pillbox and veered to the left and right of the tank at the last minute.  Dust.  Stones.  Dust.  Hooves.  Shoot.  Shoot.  Shoot.

Dad only had two chances to capture the perfect shot both in movie and still form.  It took about 40 minutes between the two stampedes just to get the horses back in place and the cameras somewhat clean.

The whole shoot from start to finish took most of the day.  Dad got his winning shot on the first run.  The horses’ hooves came within six inches of the camera lenses and about 10 inches from Dad’s face.

“When you do something like that you don’t realize how much nervous energy goes in to it.  At the end of the day you’re just beat and covered in dust.  I think that dust stuck with us for about three days even though we washed off with the garden hose a couple of times,” Dad said.

Despite the dust, Dad and his team managed to create a unique photo that captures the essence of the Old West.

If you enjoyed this story, check out these other cool horse photos!

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Horses Cowboy Dust | Beebower Productions

When Photo Shoots Fail (2)

Mysterious Sanctuary | Beebower Productions

Every professional photographer experiences failure. Sometimes we spend a lot of money to travel to a fantastic location for a limited amount of time and a giant storm hits tanking our plans. Maybe a crowded photo hot spot with lots of restrictions makes it challenging to get one photo much less multiple show stoppers. Occasionally the wildlife we drove hours to photograph decides to play hide and seek. Or maybe the mirror fell out of our camera halting all photos (true story).

Plenty of things can make photography stressful. What happens when photo shoots go awry? Do we give up and go home? Nope. We turn lemons into lemonade.

Plan B or C or D

When a shoot goes sideways, Dad and I take a step back to assess the situation. How bad is it really? We try not to get stuck in our preconceived shots and panic. We look around for a “Plan B”.

Take my situation at Garrapata Beach in Big Sur, California. I’d planned a sunset shot at the beach but a giant fog bank rolled in five minutes before the big show. I’ve done enough outdoor shots to realize things don’t always work out.

So when I arrived at the beach, I scouted out my sunset spot and then proceeded to explore other photo opportunities. Golden light bathed the entire coast in beautiful color, making it the perfect time to shoot other pictures. I photographed some unusual rocks and then I found one of my favorite photos, Footprints in the Sand.

Footprints in the Sand | Beebower Productions

It pays to ask, “What if this photo doesn’t work out? What’s Plan B or C or D?”

Because I remained flexible and I exercised the “what if” scenario, I walked away with a multitude of photos. I even shot the original sunset photo. It wasn’t the glorious explosion of color I’d imagined, but the cool, sinister look drew me in anyway.

Fog rolls into Monterey Bay often. Because it interfered with my planned shots so frequently I learned to use it in my photography. When I set out to photograph Asilomar State Beach, I envisioned beautiful sunrise colors and light hitting the rocky coast. But a giant fog bank rolled in early that morning. So I combined the fog and a long shutter speed to create Mysterious Sanctuary (the photo at the top of this blog) where the waves and fog blend together giving the photo a soft, enigmatic look. The muted colors add to the mystique.

Garrapata Trio | Beebower Productions

Just like me Dad experienced weather issues in his quest to shoot a spectacular high country elk hunt for a client. He’d traveled to Northern California’s Mt. Shasta. A blizzard shut down his location scouting. But the next day dawned clear and snow free.

Unfortunately when the crew arrived at the mountain clouds enveloped in the peak completely. Dad’s “Plan B” involved turning around. Directly behind him was the perfect spot for his elk-hunting photograph. Had he remained locked in to his original plan, he would have run way over budget and his client would have lost confidence in him.

Dad said, “You certainly have to be flexible, sometimes almost instantaneously. One minute the area looked great and the next minute a big cloud covered up the mountain. The art director was getting nervous. But I always try to have something, a Plan B. Sometimes that ‘something’ actually might be better than the original, if you’re lucky.”

High Country Elk Hunt | Beebower Productions

That mentality helped Dad out years later when he traveled to Keyhole Arch at Pfeiffer Beach in Big Sur. He loved the photos he’d seen of a shaft of light blasting through the arch. But that phenomenon only happens for a limited time in December. Due to other circumstances, he couldn’t be there in December. That didn’t deter Dad though.

He shot the arch and sunset at the same beach, but separately. Then he used some Photoshop magic create a piece of art in his own unique style.

As Ansel Adams said, “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.”

That requires staying flexible and alert for new possibilities on every photo shoot. Thinking outside the box doesn’t hurt either.

 

Keyhole Arch | Beebower Productions

Stack the Deck in Your Favor

Consistently making great photos entails being adaptable on location. However, a little preparation goes a long way in a successful photo shoot.

If you’re going to a new-to-you location, do the research. Find out things like the weather patterns for that time of year. Discover what challenges exist there. Find out about photography permits. Unearth sunset/sunrise charts and tide charts. Pinpoint services like gas stations, grocery stores and camera shops. See what other photographers share from shooting at that same location. And get reliable directions so you don’t miss the event because you’re lost. GPS coordinates often save the day.

If you’re photographing animals, learn all you can about that specific species. Dad and I delved deeply into the lives of hummingbirds before planning a shoot at Madera Canyon, Arizona. We learned their food preferences, including specific flowers, migration routes and times, behavior around other hummingbirds and where different types hung out in the United States.

That helped us narrow down a shooting location to Madera Canyon. Then we researched other photographers’ experiences in the canyon. That led us to the Santa Rita Lodge. We knew that the lodge kept year round bird feeders and that thousands of birds migrated through the area each year. We put ourselves in an area that had lot of the animal we hoped to photograph. Dad took one of his all time favorite bird photographs thanks to our diligent research.

When we go on a photo shoot, we know that it might take more than one day to shoot what we really want. Wild animals don’t necessarily cooperate and Mother Nature often throws us curve balls. So when possible we try to build in enough time at a location to work around those things.

We also realize we may need to return another time. We spent a week at Madera Canyon on two different trips. I returned to Asilomar State Beach five times before I shot Mysterious Sanctuary. Persistence, patience, and determination play a huge role in successful photography.

Broad-Billed Hummingbird at Yellow Bell | Beebower Productions

Test that Gear

While research sets us up for victory, our gear can literally make or break our photo shoots. We test and retest our gear before heading out in the field. Obviously that won’t prevent a mirror from falling out of the camera, but it does do two things for us.

First, we can quickly see if everything’s functioning well. As I mentioned in Part 1 of this blog, I recharged my camera batteries before heading out to sea. Normally I test all of the gear before leaving, but I was in a hurry that day. If I’d run a quick camera check, I would have noticed the batteries weren’t holding the charge well. I could have purchased new batteries instead of sweating bullets and doing photo triage. Lesson learned.

Second, we know how to operate our gear without thinking so we don’t miss a shot. That confidence comes from lots of practice when the pressure’s off. When we’re in the middle of a shoot, we don’t have time to think about how to set our camera’s white balance or how to cut the power in our flash. It needs to be automatic so we can focus on composition and capturing the moment.

Spicebush Swallowtail Butterfly | Beebower Productions

Take a Chance

Sometimes, no matter how well you plan, things don’t turn out as you expected. Case in point: Dad’s trip to Antelope Canyon in Arizona. He’d researched and decided to pay extra for the “photography tour” because photographers supposedly got more time to shoot in the canyon.

Unfortunately other tours ran through the same space at the same time, so it was a sea of humanity. Dad traveled light with one lens and a monopod. But even with that limited amount of gear he couldn’t maneuver well because the tour guides packed them in like sardines.

My Dad’s a perfectionist. So these conditions caused him to itch like a bad case of poison ivy. He knew he had limited time in the slot canyons. He also knew he wouldn’t be back in the area for a long time. So even though he really needed a tripod for a long exposure, a few hundred less people walking through his picture and something to keep the blowing sand off his camera, he took a chance. He hung back from the tour group, braced himself on a wall and waited for a two second break to snap this photo. He didn’t even have time to bracket before people started flowing through again.

If you know this is your one chance to capture an image but the conditions aren’t exactly right, take a chance. You might just be surprised at the results. Dad was.

Antelope Canyon | Beebower Productions

Sipping Lemonade

So the next time a photo shoot doesn’t work out as planned, take heart. We’ve all been there. Get creative, come up with a Plan B or C or D and take a chance. A positive, can-do attitude goes a long way in photography. These character-building situations create wisdom and confidence in dealing with future “failures”. Plus you might just get some tasty lemonade out of those lemons.

When Photo Shoots Fail

Pfeiffer Beach Drone | Beebower Productions

We arrived early and staked out our spot on the beach.  We waited patiently with other photographers for sunset at the magical Keyhole Arch at Pfeiffer Beach in California. 

Then we heard it.  A distinct hum filled the air and the heads of 12 photographers swiveled to and fro searching for the source.  It was… it was a drone, the bane of still photographers.  Most of us assumed the drone operator would be polite enough not to fly through our shot.  Flying above us was fine, but not through our scene.  We were wrong.

By now the sun had begun its slow descent into the ocean, so our gaggle of photographers, including Dad and I, quit looking at the drone and focused on capturing the moment.

Not two seconds later, that hateful little drone sped in front of the arch and zipped down the beach.  I heard a few muttered curses as our fellow photographers realized what was happening to their beautiful sunset shot.

I, meanwhile, focused on a rock formation far down the beach.  I thought I was in the clear.  I, too, was wrong.  The drone raced toward my rock.  Sure enough, it flew right through my photograph.

For anyone that possesses Photoshop skills, removing the drone from the image isn’t a big deal. I readily admit drones have produced some amazing footage never seen before.  But they’ve also annoyed a lot of people.  In this case 12 angry photographers kept shooting while plotting the drones’ demise.

So what happens when photo shoots go awry?  Do you give up and go home?  Let’s take a look at some of the most common reasons photo shoots fail.  Next week we’ll show you how to turn lemons into lemonade. 

Garrapata Trio | Beebower Productions

Mother Nature’s Grumpy Side

Everyone talks about the creative and nurturing Mother Nature.  Photographers give her credit for stunning sunsets, beautiful rainbows and amazing fall colors.  But this venerable lady has a petulant side.  It’s not pretty.   Mother Nature can ruin the best-laid photography plans.

Dad needed a spectacular backdrop for an elk-hunting photograph. A blizzard in California nearly spelled defeat.  Semis slid off icy roads, wet snow fell and one team member lost his wallet full of money as they scouted locations.  Things just kept getting worse.  Route 5 near the border of California and Oregon shut down one hour after Dad’s crew found a good spot for the photo.  Mother Nature forced the team to hole up at a hotel and wait for the calm after the storm.

Mother Nature’s bag of tricks includes other elements like fog.  When I planned a sunset shot at Garrapata Beach in Big Sur things looked great.  A few puffy clouds floated above the ocean, suggesting a spectacular sunset with the colors of the sinking sun brushing the sky in rich hues.  I could see a fog bank way out in the Pacific, but it seemed so far away that I didn’t think it would be a factor.  Wrong.   That fog bank hopped the express train to the shore and completely blacked out the sunset.  I took a few shots anyway, but they were duds.

Coastal California’s winter storms pack an even more debilitating punch than fog.  High wind gusts knock down trees and giant waves wash away parts of the coastline.  After these storms Point Lobos State Park often shuts down until the staff gets things cleaned up.  I frequently found myself patiently waiting for the gates to open.

Closed Point Lobos Beach | Beebower Productions

Even after getting in the park, one beach remained closed every single time I tried to visit.  A storm washed out the staircase down to the beach and then harbor seals used the beach for pupping part of the year. Over the entire two years I visited the park, it never opened.

Photographers have a love/hate relationship with Mother Nature.  But she’s not the only force that can sabotage your photos.

McWay Falls with People | Beebower Productions

People Creating Problems

If there’s a rule, people love to break it.  I, along with about 20 other photographers, waited on the cliff high above McWay Falls in California for the sunset.  My mouth hit the dirt when I saw a group of people scrambling down the cliff toward the waterfall. 

Every two feet there’s a sign stating the beach was closed for safety reasons.  Not only that, the giant gaggle of photographers stretched from one end of the overlook to the other.   Obviously they were trying to shoot the waterfall.

This group of people walked right up to the waterfall and began a private photo shoot on the beach. I know they are hard to see this small version of photo but if I blew it up for a large print they are definitely visible.  Like the drone shot, the people could be removed in Photoshop.   But it was rude.

Sometimes the problem isn’t respect rather a lot of people crammed into a single small space.  One summer Dad found himself squished into the mass of humanity touring Antelope Canyon in Arizona.  The elder Navajos consider the canyon a cathedral where one should stop and prepare to be in touch spiritually.  While Dad was in awe of the slot canyon’s grandeur, it was hard to be in sync spiritually or photographically due to the sheer number of tourists running back and forth. 

The enormous traffic jam stretched through the entire narrow, winding quarter mile canyon.  Dad realized it was going to be mighty tricky to capture a decent photo without folks stepping into his picture.  He also battled sand that blew down from the rim on to his camera gear and mixed lighting that made him wish for a tripod.  But the rules said no tripods.  He would have to work very hard to capture even one image.

Whether they’re photo bombing pictures or squeezing photographers out of a prime shooting spot, people often force photographers to be more creative and work harder to get the shot.

Hugh on Monteray Bay | Beebower Productions

Animals on the Run

Like people wild animals can be downright uncooperative.  Recently our whole family embarked on an adventure to photograph elk in Pennsylvania.  After a lot of research we developed a very solid plan.  We’d stay in a cabin near a known elk hang out.  The cabin came with a built-in photography blind plus we’d be able to use the van as a rolling blind.  We tallied the odds heavily in our favor.

Unfortunately we got stuck in traffic and then took a meandering detour, so we were running late for our check in time.  We blew past a herd of elk on the way up the mountain.  Turns out those would be the only elk we would see on this trip.  Yep.  Not a single elk for two days.

On another adventure I took Dad on a whale-watching cruise in Monterey Bay, California.  I planned it during peak whale season, so a photo should have been pretty easy to come by.

I’d sailed with the Sanctuary crew before and always returned home with some treasure: photographs of a whale, a dolphin, sea lions, harbor seals, something.  Dad wasn’t so lucky.  We stayed on the water two and half hours.  Zilch.  Zero.  Nada.  Dad’s never looked at whales the same since that ill-fated trip.

Wild animals often disappoint photographers.  They are, after all, wild.  Capturing images of them requires persistence and patience.  But it really hurts when your gear fails you.

Variegated Fritillary Butterfly | Beebower Productions

Gear, Gadgets and Disasters

Beautiful light hit the flowers perfectly.  The butterflies flocked to my garden with the warm summer air.  I was getting great stuff.

The tinkling, clinking noise totally caught me off guard.  It sounded as if it came from inside my camera.  With dread I removed the lens and realized the mirror had completely detached and fallen out.  Thankfully it wasn’t broken but it did need a trip to Canon’s repair center for some TLC.

A couple years after the dreaded mirror incident my rechargeable camera batteries began playing mind games with me.  Unfortunately I first noticed the problem while bobbing on a boat in Pacific Ocean.

I’d diligently recharged my batteries the night before my big boat trip.  In fact, I had five batteries charged and ready.  So you can imagine my surprise when I noticed the low battery icon flashing on my camera display.  I’d only taken five photos.  It was strange, but I swapped out the old batteries for new and focused on shooting.

A few minutes later, the low battery icon flashed again.  What in the heck?!  Every battery did the exact same thing.

I was forced to shoot a frame and turn off the camera. Then I’d turn it on briefly with a fully charged battery to shoot another frame before the display began blinking again.  Not ideal.  I missed shots.  I got angry.  Then I drove home and bought five new batteries.  Rechargeable batteries do have a shelf life.

The Bottom Line

Nobody likes to discuss it, but there are plenty of reasons photo shoots fail—even for professional photographers.  But you don’t have to give up in defeat.  Next week we’ll take those lemons and tell you how to turn them into lemonade.

All I Want for Christmas

Santa’s Cookies | Beebower Productions

At this time of the year everyone’s making lists for Santa including Dad and me.  If Dad would stop eating all of the cookies I make we’d even leave the jolly old fellow a smorgasbord of goodies just to grease the skids, so to speak, because we have a few things that would make our holidays bright. 

Dad and I always wanted a picture of the elusive elegant trogon.  Just one elegant trogon.  Please Santa?  That’s all we want.

We had come close, but something always got in the way.  But this time was different.  Our intel was solid:  The trogon came every day to the choke cherry bush 15 paces from the intersection of the Carrie Nation and Vault Mine trails in Arizona’s Madera Canyon. 

Confident in our sources, Dad, Mom and I hiked up the steep trail at 5 a.m. one cold morning, found the choke cherry bush and hunkered down to wait for the bird.  Excitement was building.  We could actually hear not one but two trogons calling to each other as they made their way down the canyon.

Camera.  Check.  Camouflage.  Check.  Silence.  Check.

Wildflower | Beebower Productions

And then we heard the hikers.  A loud conversation took place between the man and the woman, while the man lauded the beauty and uniqueness of every flower they found on the trail.  As the voices drew closer, the birds faded out.  In fact, we heard them calling back and forth, heading back up the canyon as fast as they could, probably snickering about hapless photographers.

Meanwhile the clueless hikers stumbled upon two frustrated photographers and their companion crouched in the shrubs along the trail.  It might have looked like a scene from “Criminal Minds”.  Maybe.  The report of missing hikers was greatly exaggerated.

Trade You a Trogon for a Bear

On another adventure to locate the elusive elegant trogon, we found ourselves in Huachuca Canyon patiently waiting in the shrubs while Mom quietly sat at a picnic table not too far away.  Nothing.  Not a single bird could be heard.

About 20 minutes later I noticed what I thought was a javelina ambling down the dirt road toward us.  As it got closer, I realized it was a little bigger than a javelina.  Actually it kinda looked like a bear.  Yes, a bear. 

Dad and I made eye contact with each other and then froze.  I began a frantic mental review of bear encounter tips.  Don’t run. No problem.  I was glued to the spot.

Make lots of noise to let the bear know you’re there.  Nope.  That bear was too close.  That didn’t seem like a good idea, especially as it wandered about 50 feet from Mom who was sitting in plain view.  But the bear acted as if she weren’t there and moved on to the berry bush behind us. 

After watching the said bush shake vigorously for a few minutes, our trio quietly crept back to the van and jetted out of the canyon.  In the shock of the moment neither Dad nor I took a picture of the bear, and we certainly didn’t shoot a picture of an elegant trogon.  The shoot was a bust.

So Santa, if you could send a trogon our way this Christmas we’d be mighty happy.  If the trogon’s too much trouble could you at least give us a really nice, safe lightning photograph?

Killer Lightning, Please

Last summer Dad and I trekked through Utah, Colorado and New Mexico on our “Great Southwest Photo Adventure”.  We photographed multiple amazing locations. Dad also hoped for a killer lightning shot (no pun intended) during the afternoon monsoon storms.

We’d wrapped up two weeks of travel and still no lightning.  But we decided to stop at Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument in New Mexico for some landscape shots on our way back to Texas.  As we pulled into the parking lot we noticed storm clouds building far, far away.  It looked like we’d have time for a short hike.

We set out on the Cave Trail, a 1.2 mile hike, that wanders close to the white cliffs and fantastical cone shaped spires.  About 1 mile down the trail, a brisk wind kicked up, cooling us off from the sweltering August temperatures. 

Both of us have been out in the desert during monsoon season.  We realized that wind might feel nice, but it could spell trouble.  Dad kept one eye on the skies while I picked up the pace so we could at least get a panoramic shot before a storm hit.

Off in the distance, I heard a faint rumble of thunder.  It galvanized me into action.  I shot pictures like a paparazzi on a bender.  Horizon line straight?  Who cares?  We can fix it in Photoshop.  Just shoot, shoot, shoot!

Sudden Storm | Beebower Productions

Then like the spaceship scene in “Independence Day” a very dark, very ominous cloud crested the ridge of the mountains and blotted out the sun.  Our heads swiveled up and our mouths dropped open simultaneously.  The cloud hovered over the far end of the mountains while throwing out lightning bolts left and right. 

This wasn’t just a little rain shower.  This was a storm.   With little grace or coordination Dad and I raced back down the trail to the parking lot praying all the while that we wouldn’t end up on the evening news as fried photographers.

To our utter amazement and horror a grandmother with two children headed up the trail and toward the storm.   As we ran past them my exact thoughts were,” What?!  That. Is. Crazy!!!!” We almost mentioned the storm to them, but by then it was pretty obvious something big was about to happen.  So we kept running as lightning started to get uncomfortably close to us.

Just as the first big, fat raindrops hit us, we skidded to a stop at the van.  We threw our gear in the back and slammed the doors as the sky just opened up and all heck broke lose. 

Boy that was one doozy of a storm.  Lightning, flood conditions and hail. We dodged it on the way to the van, on the way out of the park and waiting on the side of the road when the rain came down so hard we couldn’t see.  Dad got his lightning.  But when you’re in the middle of the storm, lightning photos are pretty hard to get because you’re too busy trying not to get killed.

So Santa, this year we’d really like some lightning photos that we don’t require dodging bolts of said lightning.

If you can deliver an elegant trogon and lightning photos, I’ll leave you a whole batch of my best gingerbread cookies.  Well, unless Dad beats you to it.  But they say it’s the thought that counts, right?

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